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Project Management Blog
Saturday, 16 June 2007 09:46

Deming's 5th Point in Project Management

Continuous Improvement

This is one of my favorite points from Dr. Deming. I see so many mistakes that are made again and again, and lessons learned that are either completely undocumented or filed away after a project, never to be seen again.

Do all of the other project managers in the firm get exposure to lessons learned from other projects? Usually not, in my experience. Surely, individual project managers and sponsors learn from their projects, but organizational learning and continuous improvement require a formal process for the documentation, analysis, and incorporation of lessons learned into a common methodology.

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Monday, 23 April 2007 08:27

So What?

Anyone who has teenagers or has had to deal with them will inevitably run in to one with a bad attitude.  Their whole attitude says “SO WHAT?”   As project managers we deal with a lot of issues, risks, problems and people.  Some times it makes you want to throw your hands up and say, “So what?!?!”  Actually, that might not be a bad idea.  How would that look for issues, risks, budget or schedule problems and politics? 

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Monday, 02 April 2007 08:43

Avoiding Hindsight Management

Growing up in rural western New York we had cold, long winters.  Natural gas wasn’t cheap even then.  With 4 sons and a chain saw, my dad would cut enough firewood to heat a big, four-bedroom, 2-story home from October to April. 
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Thursday, 08 March 2007 04:04

Risk Management - the Other Dimension

The issue of risks on projects is considered a critical issue for the successful completion. Often, delays, cost overruns and claims are attributed to the absence or inadequacy of a risk management exercise. In a large and complex project, a risk management exercise was run. In the process of evaluating the risks, a new dimension was proposed in order to ensure adequacy of the exercise. The exercise originally followed the well documented steps of risk management. This included:
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Thursday, 01 March 2007 01:27

Stakeholder Management

Project managers deal with dynamic environments. Their role is not only to deliver projects on time, within budget and to the required quality, but extend to include other aspects that are equally important.
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Saturday, 27 January 2007 17:33

Risk Monitor & Control

This is the process of identifying, analyzing, and planning for risks. The PM keeps track of the identified risks, reanalyzing of existing risks, monitoring trigger conditions for contingency plans, monitoring residual risks, and reviewing the execution of risk responses while evaluating their effectiveness. It is done by using techniques, such as variance and trend analysis, which require the use of performance data generated during project execution. Project work should be continuously monitored for new and changing risks. Other purposes of Risk Monitoring and Control are to determine if:
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Saturday, 27 January 2007 17:05

Project Risk Management

Risk Management is the process of measuring, or assessing risk and then developing strategies to manage the risk. In general, the strategies employed include transferring the risk to another party, avoiding the risk, reducing the negative effect of the risk, and accepting some or all of the consequences of a particular risk. The Risk Management Plan (RMP) is the document prepared by a Project manager to foresee risks, to estimate the effectiveness and to mitigate them.

 

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Thursday, 25 January 2007 18:22

Scope Definition

Decomposing the major project deliverables into smaller, more manageable components completes scope Definition. There are a good number of outputs from the Scope Definition phases that you’ll need to be familiar with.

Scope definition is the subdivision of project deliverables into smaller (and more manageable) pieces until you have adequately identified in the work breakdown structure all the work on the project. 

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Thursday, 25 January 2007 15:15

Stakeholder Management

You should recognize the importance of involving stakeholders in the development of the project plan. It is the responsibility of the project manager and the project team to create an environment in which all stakeholders can contribute as appropriate, but recognize that who contributes and the level of the contribution will vary by stakeholder. There are usually a number of people who are either directly involved in a project or who have a stake in its outcome. These people are called stakeholders. The key stakeholders in most projects are:

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