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Project Management Blog
Tuesday, 21 August 2007 06:14

Project Planning:

Every year thousands of projects are completed over budget, out of scope and past deadline.  Still, with each passing year, project managers continue to rush into projects without due diligence in defining the project and creating a plan for project execution.  By lightly addressing these critical components they are, in essence, failing their projects before any work has even commenced.  So how can project managers efficiently execute a project plan while at the same time meeting the deadlines and expectations of senior management?

 

Published in Blogs
Saturday, 12 May 2007 10:43

Deming's 3rd Point in Project Management

Inspection is a Tool for Improvement, Not a Whip

Deming's third point urges practitioners to design quality into processes, using inspection as an information-gathering tool to do so. In project management, the processes and systems make up a methodology. Does your organization have a consistent methodology, or does everyone run projects their own way?

Inspecting project performance through the lens of continuous improvement facilitates applying lessons learned to a consistent and ever-improving methodology. This can not be done effectively unless there is a consistent system of managing projects in the first place.

Published in Blogs
Monday, 02 April 2007 08:43

Avoiding Hindsight Management

Growing up in rural western New York we had cold, long winters.  Natural gas wasn’t cheap even then.  With 4 sons and a chain saw, my dad would cut enough firewood to heat a big, four-bedroom, 2-story home from October to April. 
Published in Blogs
Saturday, 27 January 2007 17:15

Risk Identification

PMI defines risk identification as determining which risk events are likely to affect the project and documenting the characteristics of each. This process involves identifying three related factors: (1) potential sources of risk (schedule, cost, technical, legal, and so on), (2) possible risk events, and (3) risk symptoms.

The timing of risk identification is also of vital importance. PMI® advocates that risk identification should first be accomplished at the outset of the project and then be updated regularly throughout the project life cycle. 

Published in Blogs
Saturday, 27 January 2007 17:05

Project Risk Management

Risk Management is the process of measuring, or assessing risk and then developing strategies to manage the risk. In general, the strategies employed include transferring the risk to another party, avoiding the risk, reducing the negative effect of the risk, and accepting some or all of the consequences of a particular risk. The Risk Management Plan (RMP) is the document prepared by a Project manager to foresee risks, to estimate the effectiveness and to mitigate them.

 

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 21:20

Project Human Resources

The Project Human Resource Management questions on the PMP® certification exam focus heavily on organizational structures, roles and responsibilities of the project manager, team building, and conflict resolution. The Project Human Resource Management processes include the following:

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 17:41

Configuration Management

Configuration management is the term given to the identification, tracking and managing of all the assets of a project; it focuses on controlling the characteristics of a product or service (also referred to as deliverables). In a general sense, configuration management consists of the following:

 

  • The documentation of the features, characteristics, and functions of a product or service
  • The applied control to restrict changes to the features, characteristics, and function of the product or service
  • The process of documenting any changes to the product or service
  • The ongoing auditing of products and services to ensure their conformance to documented requirements
  • Establishes a method to consistently identify and request changes to established baselines
  • To assess the value and effectiveness of changes
  • Provides opportunities to continuously validate and improve the project by considering the impact of each change
  • Provides the mechanism for the project management team to consistently communicate all changes to the stakeholders.

 

Configuration management activities included in the integrated change control process are:

  • Configuration Identification - Providing the basis from which the configuration of products is defined and verified, products and documents are labeled, changes are managed, and accountability is maintained.
  • Configuration Status Accounting - Capturing, storing, and accessing configuration information needed to manage products and product information effectively.
  • Configuration Verification and Auditing - Establishing that the performance and functional requirements defined in the configuration documentation have been met.

When it comes to configuration management, think paperwork. Think about all the paperwork that is involved in documenting every single component of a system deliverable and making sure that there are no changes to that deliverable, or if there are changes, that they are thoroughly documented. Configuration management is traceable. For the exam, know that all change must be screened, tracked, accepted, approved, and the development process updated thereafter.

 

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