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Project Management Blog

The creation of a Project Scope Statement doesn’t need to be a daunting task. Through the use of collaborative decision making and facilitated meetings techniques, it is realistic to build the components of the scope statement while gaining alignment from all project stakeholders in as few as two (2) days. The alignment gained from this upfront scoping effort will form the foundation for success throughout the remainder of the project. The key to this dynamic activity is effective planning and execution of a Project Scope Facilitate Meeting, using collaborative JAD techniques, to build the necessary scope outputs for a project.

Published in Blogs
Sunday, 12 August 2007 21:11

Point 12 - Deming in Project Management

Enable Pride of Workmanship

Deming claimed that the sense of having helped other people is the most significant motivator and source of job satisfaction. It is one of the biggest enablers for pride of workmanship.

Of the projects you have worked on, think about the ones you are most proud of. What is it that makes you look back and say, “Wow! Look what we did!!!”
Published in Blogs
Saturday, 27 January 2007 17:15

Risk Identification

PMI defines risk identification as determining which risk events are likely to affect the project and documenting the characteristics of each. This process involves identifying three related factors: (1) potential sources of risk (schedule, cost, technical, legal, and so on), (2) possible risk events, and (3) risk symptoms.

The timing of risk identification is also of vital importance. PMI® advocates that risk identification should first be accomplished at the outset of the project and then be updated regularly throughout the project life cycle. 

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 20:56

Cost Performance Measurements

Earned Value - Earned value management is a project management technique for estimating how a project is doing in terms of its budget and schedule. It compares the work finished so far with the estimates made in the beginning of the project. This gives a measure of how far the project is from completion. Through EV the project manager can get an estimate on how much resources the project will have used at completion. “Earned Value Analysis” is an industry standard way to measure a project’s progress, forecast its completion date and final cost and provide schedule and budget variances along the way. By integrating three measurements, it provides consistent, numerical indicators with which you can evaluate and compare projects.

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 19:16

Activity Duration Estimating

Duration includes the actual amount of time worked on an activity plus the elapsed time.

Effort is the number of workdays or work hours required to complete a task. Effort does not normally equal duration. People doing the work should help create estimates, and the PM should review them. Duration estimating is assessing the number of work periods (hours, days, weeks,) likely to be needed to complete each activity. Duration estimates always include some indication of the range of possible results, for example, 2 weeks + or – 2 days or 85% probability that the activity will take less than 3 weeks. Activity Duration Estimating:

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 18:25

Creating a Work Breakdown Structure

A WBS identifies all the tasks required to complete the project. The focus of the WBS can be either Product (deliverable) or Project oriented, or both. WBS elements are usually numbered, and the numbering system may be arranged in various manners. If a WBS is extensive and if the category content is not obvious to the project team members, it may be useful to write a WBS Dictionary. This describes what is in each WBS element. It may also say what is not in an element. The primary purpose of the WBS is to develop or create small manageable chunks of work called work packages.

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 18:17

Project Scope

Project scope management, according to the PMBOK, constitutes 'the processes to ensure that the project includes all of the work required, and only the work required, to complete the project successfully.' Project scope management has several purposes: 

Published in Blogs
Thursday, 25 January 2007 17:33

Preliminary Scope Statement

This document establishes the reason for doing the project and provides a high-level product description. Its intent is to serve as a reference for future project decisions on what will-and will not-be accomplished within the project. The Scope Statement provides reasons for and justification of the project deliverables. In addition, the Scope Statement should provide detailed information on what the project objectives are, how they will be measured, and the expected level of quality.

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