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Thursday, 25 January 2007 18:28

Scope Control

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The most prominent tool applied with scope change control is the Integrated Change Control System. Because changes are likely to happen within any project, there must be order to process, document, and manage the changes.

This system may include:

  • Cataloging the documented requests and paperwork
  • Tracking the requests through the system
  • Determining the required approval levels for varying changes
  • Supporting the integrated change control policies of the project
  • In instances when the project is performed through a contractual relationship, the scope change control system must map to the requirements of the contract

Note: Uncontrolled change is referred to as Scope Creep.

Scope Creep in project management refers to uncontrolled changes in a project's scope. This can occur when the scope of a project is not properly defined, documented, and controlled. Scope increase consists of either new products or new features of already approved products. Hence, the project team drifts away from its original purpose, to some degree. Because of one's tendency to focus on only one dimension of a project, scope creep can also result in a project team overrunning its original budget and schedule. As the scope of a project grows, more tasks must be completed at the same cost and in the same time frame as the original series of project tasks.

Scope creep can be a result of:

  • Poor change control
  • Lack of proper identification of what products and features are required to bring about the achievement of project objectives in the first place.
  • Weak project manager or executive sponsor

Scope control covers issues similar to change control, but it focuses solely on scope changes. Note that these changes may either expand the project’s scope or contract it. Changes are generally the result of:

  • An external event  
  • An error or omission when the scope was initially designed
  • A value-added change

 

 

Read 6078 times Last modified on Friday, 11 December 2009 00:41

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