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404Click Here to Listen to the interview: http://bit.ly/PMPodcast404
Read More: http://bit.ly/PMPodcast_404

A large number of projects these days rely on virtual teams. This means that we project managers must master how we communicate in a virtual setting in order to properly lead our teams. But how do you build trust as a leader if nobody can actually see you?

This interview with Sara Gallagher was recorded at the awe-inspiring Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2017 in Chicago, Illinois. It is based on her presentation "You Can Trust Me: Communicating When Nobody Can See Your Face" and explores tools and techniques project leaders can apply to improve communication and convey trust even in digital and virtual settings. Here is what Sara wrote about her presentation:

Trust is essential to effective communication across your team and your stakeholders - but how can you communicate trust when no one can see your face? This engaging session will examine how the four cores of trust are impacted in a digital, global communication environment. Participants will be given the opportunity to immediately apply what they've learned to improve communication across their teams

 

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this content is from the TenStep weekly "tips" email dated 2017.08.11

Review Three Techniques to Create a Work Breakdown Structure

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is the first step to create a schedule.The WBS helps break the project work into smaller pieces that help more easily understand the work. Here are three techniques that can help you understand the WBS for your project.1. Understand the difference between detail and summary activities

If you look at a WBS activity and determine that it needs to be broken down to another level, the original activity becomes known as a "summary" level. A summary activity represents a logical roll-up of the activities that are under it. On the other hand “detailed” activities are those that have not been broken down further. Once the detailed activities are under the summary activity are completed, the summary activity is also considered to be completed.

2. The top-level of the WBS can be the hardest to define

Sometimes people have a hard time getting a WBS started because they are not sure what to put at the very top and they are uncertain about how to break the work down from there. There are a number of options for defining the WBS at level 1 (under the top level 0).

  • It might make sense to place the major project deliverables directly at level 1, and break the deliverables into smaller components on the next level, if necessary.

  • Another option for level 1 is to describe the organizations that will be involved, such as Sales, Marketing, IT, etc. The next level should describe the deliverables that each organization will produce. 

  • A third option is to look at level 1 in terms of the project life cycle; for instance analysis, design, construct, etc. If that is the best logical way to look at level 1, then level 2 should describe the deliverables produced in each life cycle stage.

Although there are many ways that the WBS can be started, ultimately you want to uncover deliverables.

2. Identify top-level structure first, then deliverables, and then activities

After the top level (or maybe level 2), you start by writing the names of the major deliverables on Post-it notes - one deliverable per note. The deliverables are placed within the organization structure defined at level 1 - by organization, by phase, etc. If any of the deliverables are very large, you can create a lower level under that deliverable that describe the deliverable at a lower level. This lower level is a "work package". In general two levels should be enough to describe the deliverables and the work packages that make up the deliverable. A very complex deliverable might need three levels.

At this point you have a deliverable-based WBS. You can break the work down further into the detailed activities that are needed to actually build the deliverables. If you go to this kevel you have an activity-based WBS.



At TenStep we are dedicated to helping organizations achieve their goals and strategies through the successful execution of critical business projects. We provide training, consulting and products for organizations to help them set up an environment where projects are successful. This includes help with strategic planning, portfolio management, program / project management, Project Management Offices (PMOs) and project lifecycles. For more information, visit www.TenStep.com or contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Rate this item
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this content is from the TenStep weekly "tips" email dated 2017.08.11

Review Three Techniques to Create a Work Breakdown Structure

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is the first step to create a schedule.The WBS helps break the project work into smaller pieces that help more easily understand the work. Here are three techniques that can help you understand the WBS for your project.1. Understand the difference between detail and summary activities

If you look at a WBS activity and determine that it needs to be broken down to another level, the original activity becomes known as a "summary" level. A summary activity represents a logical roll-up of the activities that are under it. On the other hand “detailed” activities are those that have not been broken down further. Once the detailed activities are under the summary activity are completed, the summary activity is also considered to be completed.

2. The top-level of the WBS can be the hardest to define

Sometimes people have a hard time getting a WBS started because they are not sure what to put at the very top and they are uncertain about how to break the work down from there. There are a number of options for defining the WBS at level 1 (under the top level 0).

  • It might make sense to place the major project deliverables directly at level 1, and break the deliverables into smaller components on the next level, if necessary.

  • Another option for level 1 is to describe the organizations that will be involved, such as Sales, Marketing, IT, etc. The next level should describe the deliverables that each organization will produce. 

  • A third option is to look at level 1 in terms of the project life cycle; for instance analysis, design, construct, etc. If that is the best logical way to look at level 1, then level 2 should describe the deliverables produced in each life cycle stage.

Although there are many ways that the WBS can be started, ultimately you want to uncover deliverables.

2. Identify top-level structure first, then deliverables, and then activities

After the top level (or maybe level 2), you start by writing the names of the major deliverables on Post-it notes - one deliverable per note. The deliverables are placed within the organization structure defined at level 1 - by organization, by phase, etc. If any of the deliverables are very large, you can create a lower level under that deliverable that describe the deliverable at a lower level. This lower level is a "work package". In general two levels should be enough to describe the deliverables and the work packages that make up the deliverable. A very complex deliverable might need three levels.

At this point you have a deliverable-based WBS. You can break the work down further into the detailed activities that are needed to actually build the deliverables. If you go to this kevel you have an activity-based WBS.



At TenStep we are dedicated to helping organizations achieve their goals and strategies through the successful execution of critical business projects. We provide training, consulting and products for organizations to help them set up an environment where projects are successful. This includes help with strategic planning, portfolio management, program / project management, Project Management Offices (PMOs) and project lifecycles. For more information, visit www.TenStep.com or contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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403Click Here to Listen to the interview: http://bit.ly/PMPodcast403
Read More: http://bit.ly/PMPodcast_403

Advanced product quality planning (or APQP) is a framework of procedures and techniques used to develop products in industry, particularly the automotive industry.

This interview about APQP with Marygracesoleil Ericson (LinkedIn Profile) was recorded one day before the excellent Project Management Institute (PMI)® Global Conference 2017 in Chicago, Illinois.

Marygracesoleil was an attendee of the congress (not a speaker) who contacted me and suggested that we do an interview on a topic relevant to her industry. She is the PMO manager of a car audio equipment manufacturer, leading a team of program managers who build designs and coponents for the audio divisions in the automotive industry. If you have a premium sound system in your car then you might be using their speakers.

For more information about APQP please visit the APQP Wikipedia Page.

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402Click Here to Listen to the interview: http://bit.ly/PMPodcast402
Read More: http://bit.ly/PMPodcast-402

Here are some buzzwords for you:
Multi-generational teams. Generational shifts. Inter- and intra-generational communication. Multi-generational workplace. Millennials vs baby boomers. I think you get the idea... right? We’re here today to talk about how old I am... :-) Just kidding... we’re here to talk about generational sensitivity and diversity and how to make the best of it in project management.

And in order to explore this generational topic we turn to our "soft side expert" Margaret Meloni (www.margaretmeloni.com). She has been an IT and project manager for some time and has had the pleasure to work with people from many generations. And I’m not saying she’s old either...

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